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How To Build Your Guitar Teaching Business And Earn More Money

Posted by on Nov 18, 2018 in Teaching | Comments Off on How To Build Your Guitar Teaching Business And Earn More Money

The fact that you are reading this article right now means you are currently unsatisfied with how much money you are earning as a guitar teacher (or you are ready to take things to the next level). With this in mind, you are certainly not alone. Here is the bleak reality for most guitar teachers:

1. Many guitar instructors have a hard time making ends meet in their guitar teaching business and make less than 35k annually.

2. Most people who teach guitar have no experience teaching highly skilled students.

3. The overwhelming majority of guitar teachers achieve little success and only teach for 1-2 years before quitting to work in a different profession altogether.

On the other hand, there exists a small percentage of highly successful guitar teachers who:

1. Make a minimum of 6 figures each year in their guitar teaching businesses.

2. Quickly turn their guitar students from mediocre players to highly skilled players.

3. Are able to add extra value for their students because they have extra time, energy and resources to put into their guitar instruction.

4. Generally work no more than part time hours every week.

At first, most people are shocked to hear about the above points. As someone who has trained countless people to develop successful guitar teaching businesses (by joining the elite top 1% club), I know all of these things to be true.

Additionally, the majority of guitar teachers out there do not fail because they are necessarily ‘bad’ at teaching guitar. Instead, they fail because they believe in the ‘common knowledge’ they have heard being perpetuated by other unsuccessful guitar teachers. These approaches seem rational at first glance, but in fact are highly damaging for your guitar teaching business in many ways.

Here are seven commonly accepted guitar teaching approaches that guarantee failure:

1. Giving Guitar Lessons At A Local Music Store

Many guitar teachers think that it is easier to teach at a music store (rather than on their own) and make good money because:

A. They will have to do less work to find new students since the music store will do this for them.

B. You look much more professional teaching from a music store versus teaching from home.

Both of these points are 100% false. If you teach out of a music store you are highly likely to fail and here’s why:

In reality, music stores do not have a strong reason to find new guitar students for ‘you’. Even if you work together with a music company, you will still need to come up with strategic ways to get guitar students and grow your guitar teaching business.
Additionally, you make less money when you work from a music store because you must give a large percentage of your earnings to the owner. This makes it more challenging to earn a good living as a guitar teacher.
To make things worse, music stores generally are very strict about the teaching formats they allow. In many cases, you are limited to teaching only private 1 on 1 lessons and not allowed to help your guitar students progress faster using other formats. This makes it harder to get big results for your students.
Since you can’t get great results for your students, it will be very difficult to develop the positive reputation needed to grow your guitar teaching business to the next level.

The most successful and highest earning guitar teachers never teach out of music stores. Instead, they run their own business and hire other guitar teachers to work for them. If you want to make a great living teaching guitar, you must treat it like a business and learn all you can in order to improve every aspect of it.

2. Using All Of Your Promotional Efforts To Bring In ‘New’ Students

Most people assume that searching for new students is the most important part of promoting their guitar teaching business. Of course, understanding how to attract new students is very important. However, if this is the only factor you consider while trying to build your guitar teaching business, you will quickly come across these issues:

Since you do not have a solid strategy for ‘keeping’ your students, you must invest countless hours into your promotional efforts due to the fact that the new students you gain only replace the ones you lost.
You will only make slow progress at best to build your guitar teaching business (even if you get more new students than you lose current ones). However, you can achieve much faster growth by working in several different areas simultaneously, such as: student retention, student referrals and converting potential students into actual students.

Avoid the issues I mentioned above by continually working to improve in ‘every’ area of your guitar teaching business (not just one or two). Once you do this, you will see exponential growth that will give you the ability to expand your business while working a lot less hours and putting out much less effort.

3. Always Showing Your Guitar Students Anything They Want To Learn

Many guitar teachers are in the habit of asking their students what they want to learn each time they take lessons. They believe that it is the responsibility of the student to tell the teacher what they need to work on. This is TOTALLY untrue. Consider this: if your guitar students actually knew what they needed to work on, wouldn’t they have already done it themselves and reached their guitar playing goals? The truth is that most guitar students are clueless about what they ‘should’ be working on to get better (this is why they came to you in the first place). It is not the student’s responsibility to figure this out, it is yours. You must always learn the student’s ‘long term goals’ up front and design an effective strategy to help them reach these goals. Additionally, you need to help your guitar students understand specifically WHY the things you teach them are both what they ‘need’ and ‘want’ to learn.

If you continually allow your students to tell you what they need to learn, they will NOT make any significant progress. The most they can achieve with this approach is a decent understanding of various isolated ideas… but they will not become ‘great musicians’. In fact, this approach will cause many of your guitar students to leave when they are unsatisfied with the lack of results they are getting.

In addition, not being able to effectively get results for your students will affect your reputation in a very negative way. Once you develop a bad reputation as a guitar teacher in your area, you will essentially be left with two options: Quit teaching guitar or find a new location to teach in.

4. Copying The Ideas Of Other Guitar Teachers In Your Area

Most beginning guitar teachers naturally look around to see what other teachers are doing in hopes that copying the approaches of others will help them build their businesses. The bad news is, MOST guitar teachers are unsuccessful. This means that when you copy what other teachers are doing you are only setting yourself up for the same failure.

Instead of following what other local guitar teachers do while taking a trial-and-error approach, you should surround yourself with successful guitar teachers who are already making good money in their teaching businesses. Of course, no teacher in your local area is going to want to share his/her secrets with you (since you are competing with each other) so your network must be made up of guitar teachers who do not compete with you locally.

Many guitar teachers participate in my guitar teacher improvement program and gain the benefits of working in a tight group full of successful music instructors from around the world.

5. Not Enforcing Your Lesson Policies

Most guitar teachers who are new have a fear that enforcing their lesson policies will cause them to lose their students. The truth is, this may help you retain a few students for a short period of time, but will be devastating for your guitar teaching business in the long term. Here is why:

A. This attracts guitar students who are not serious about learning. This means you will have to deal with students who are consistently late, do not pay on time and do not practice like they are supposed to.

B. Due to the above point, you will use all of your energy on ‘non-serious’ students and have little left to spare for the SERIOUS students who really do want to learn, pay on time and practice every day.

C. When you allow students to break your lesson policies, you will constantly have to deal with endless requests and complaints rather than actually helping your students become great guitar players. This means your students will not get the results they want, you will earn significantly less income, become frustrated and ultimately join the majority of unsuccessful guitar teachers I mentioned earlier.

Here is how you solve this issue: Remember, YOU are the teacher and YOU understand what is best for your guitar students. Create your lesson policy and expectations based on this understanding and make sure that your students know exactly why this policy will help them become much better players. If they do not comply, do not teach them (that’s right, refuse to work with them).

6. Lowering Your Lesson Rates In Order To Compete With Other Guitar Teachers

While giving lessons in a town or city with heavy competition from other guitar teachers, it is natural to think that lowering your lesson rates will give more potential students a chance to work with you. If you are considering this approach, chances are you think that giving cheaper lessons will make you stand out from the more ‘expensive’ guitar teachers in your area. You may have even heard students complain about not wanting to spend a lot of money on guitar lessons and allowed this to affect your judgment. However, in the end this approach will backfire on you. Here’s why:

The fact that you charge very cheap rates for lessons tells potential students that you are either new to teaching guitar or are not very good at it. In fact, most students assume that teachers with higher priced lessons charge more because they can get better results. So by charging a small amount for your lessons, you are really only driving away serious students (who are ready to spend money). The more serious a student is, the less likely they are to even think about taking lessons with you when you are the cheapest guitar teacher in town.
When you start teaching guitar while charging very cheap rates, your students will see this and think that all guitar teachers are the same (except for the price they charge for lessons). This (of course) is totally false. However, you must take this into consideration when determining your lesson rates. If you charge cheap rates from the beginning, it will only be more difficult to raise them in the future after you have conditioned your students to think that all teachers are the same.
When you gain new guitar students who were only looking for the ‘cheapest’ teacher, they will take lessons with you much less seriously. You will quickly find that these types of students do not practice or put out much effort because they do not feel like they are getting much value in return (based on how much they are spending). The more a student has to spend for lessons, the more seriously they will take it.

All of these issues will combine together to weigh you down and keep you from ever making good money teaching guitar.

So how can you solve this issue and how much SHOULD you charge for guitar lessons? Always make sure that you charge a ‘minimum’ of the average price in your local area (even if you are just getting started). Next, work to make your guitar lessons as valuable as possible in order to transform your students into great guitar players very quickly. Once you can do this, you gain the leverage to raise your rates and have a justified reason for doing so.

7. Promoting Yourself As A ‘General’ Guitar Teacher

Another misconception that most guitar teachers have is that you should try to reach as many students as possible through a highly generalized marketing approach. These teachers promote themselves by saying they teach in ‘any’ style.

The truth is, promoting yourself in this manner will mostly attract students who aren’t very serious about guitar lessons and/or don’t know what they want to play on guitar. These types of students are likely to not take practice seriously, only take lessons for a short period of time and will not be very cooperative with your lesson policies.

On the other hand, the greatest guitar students (who you want to work with) are always looking for a teacher who specializes in a specific niche because they know what they want to play and invest the time to look for someone who can help them play it.

It is crucial to understand that you will not be able to make a living as a guitar teacher if you have a schedule full of casual, non-serious students. These students will only cause you to waste time as you put up with endless lesson cancellations, missing payments and other issues. Even though these problems are only ‘partially’ related to the issue of marketing yourself to ‘all styles’, they are entirely CAUSED by it and will keep you from becoming financially successful as a guitar teacher.

With this in mind, you don’t want to become an expert for a style of music that no guitar student wants to learn. Nevertheless, you will see much more success by marketing yourself as the local ‘blues’ guitar expert (or ‘rock’, ‘metal’, ‘jazz’, etc.) instead of allowing yourself to blend in with your competitors as a teacher to ‘all styles’.

Most importantly, know that you must fill your guitar teaching schedule with the ‘right’ students if you want to make good money as a teacher. These students will quickly progress on guitar, study with you for years and help you expand your business by telling others about their positive experience.

Although I have not discussed ‘all’ of the things that cause guitar teachers to fail, after reading the points above you have gained a better understanding of why most commonly accepted guitar teaching approaches are actually ineffective and problematic.

Get guitar teaching help now and start making a lot more in your guitar teaching business while avoiding the obstacles that most teachers face (and never overcome). Once you understand what needs to be fixed, you will then be prepared to take any necessary actions to grow your guitar teaching business and earn more income from it than you ever thought possible!

Tom Hess is an electric guitar teacher online, recording artist and the guitar player of the band Rhapsody Of Fire. He trains guitar teachers from around the world on how to build their guitar teaching businesses in his guitar teaching program. Visit his musician website to get guitar teaching help, learn how to get guitar students and find more articles about teaching guitar for a living.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/T._Hess/369989

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25 Things You Should Know About Becoming a Teacher

Posted by on Nov 4, 2018 in Teaching History | 21 comments

This is a video I made for my cohort. Feel free to use it with new teacher inductions, teacher graduations, or any other thing that honors teacehrs.

25 Things to Know About Teaching

Congratulations. You are about to enter one of the most noble professions in the world. Here are 25 things you should know about ahead of time:
That’s right. Twenty-five.

1. During the first week of school, your feet are going to hurt.
2. You will rediscover the joy of simple things, like smelly markers.
3. You will have teacher nightmares the month before you start teaching. It’s totally normal. We all get them.
4. But some of those nightmares will become a reality. Because you’re going to fail. Hard. But each mistake is another iteration closer to success. So, keep experimenting.
5. You will learn to hold your bladder for hours on end. If this were an Olympic sport, teachers would be gold medalists.
6. You will cry in your car. Or at your desk. Or maybe even both.
7. You’re going to put on weight. It’s like the freshman fifteen, except it might be 20 or 25.
8. You will yell at your class. You will apologize. And your students will amaze you when they forgive you on the spot.
9. But here’s the thing. You’re going to have amazing lessons and you’ll shock yourself with how awesome you are when you bring your A game.
10. You will leave your lunch at home and eat it from the vending machine. You’ll convince yourself that Cheez-Its and Cheetohs are a full portion of dairy.
11. You’re going to start carrying around hand sanitizer everywhere. Or, as the kids call it, “Hanitizer”
12. From this year forward, you are going to be stuck watching the same Bloodborne Pathogen video year after year after year. Welcome to the club.
13. You’re going to fall asleep at 5:00 in the evening with a half-empty carton of Ben and Jerry’s and a massive pile of papers.
14. You’re going to try to do too much and try too hard and that’s okay. Just give yourself permission to rest. Watch a movie. Read a book. Go out into nature. Take care of your health.
15. Your students are going to amaze you with their work and their ideas and their growth
16. You’ll feel like the luckiest person alive. And you are. But here’s the thing. So are your students.
17. You will worry about your students. You will have a student whose story breaks your heart and you will think about that child every day when you go home.
18. Then you will go back and you will listen to that child and affirm that child and teach that child and love that child even when they are difficult. Because you are a teacher and that’s what we do.
19. Someday the kids in your class will come back and invite you to their college graduation and hand you a thank you note and you’ll cry in your car just like you did in the first year of teaching.
20. Even on your worst days, you are going to think critically and promote justice and transform the teaching practice.
21. You will inspire students to be better people and
22. empower them to be deeper thinkers.
23. They will feel safe and loved and challenged.
24. They will be the makers who build a better future.
25. And the world will be better place. Because of you.

Prof Damina Chauudhary
Video Rating: / 5

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Alumni Share Strategies for Growth at Wharton Scale School Workshops

Posted by on Oct 21, 2018 in School Workshops | 2 comments

Prof. Karl Ulrich, Vice Dean of Entrepreneurship & Innovation, on the recent launch of the Wharton Scale School Workshop Series at Wharton San Francisco. At these events, Penn and Wharton Alumni in the area are able to gain insights from experienced business leaders and meet fellow alumni.

On Friday 12 June we invited St Patrick’s Primary School Belfast along to the MAC to take part in our MAC Workshop with artist Paddy Bloomer.

Taking inspiration from the artwork “Dream – Spontaneous Combustion” by Olaf Brzeski, located in our Sunken Gallery as part of the exhibition ‘I will go there, take me home’, we challenged the Primary 6 pupils to get creative, have fun and even prank their teacher.

If you’re interested in organising a workshop for your school or group or want to know about other ways to Get Creative at the MAC then please contact our Learning & Participation Officer Clare Lawlor on clare@themaclive.com or call 028 9089 2960.

https://themaclive.com/community/primary-schools

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K.Graham Teaching Demo History Lesson

Posted by on Oct 7, 2018 in Teaching History | 6 comments

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Shrewsbury Folk Festival Room For All School Workshops

Posted by on Sep 23, 2018 in School Workshops | 20 comments

A short film chronicling the educational outreach work carried out by the festival’s Room for All project that aimed to celebrate diversity and inclusivity.

Dance artists: Sonia Sabri, Rachel Leggit and Poppy Mansfield.

Schools: Chirbury Primary School, Gobowen Primary School and St George’s Junior and Radbrook Primary in Shrewsbury.

For more information, go to www.shrewsburyfolkfestival.co.uk/line-up/special-projects-room-for-all/.

Film produced by Media Active with financial support from Arts Council England and Shropshire Council
Video Rating: / 5

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