Pages Navigation Menu

UK Primary Education!

How To Build Your Guitar Teaching Business And Earn More Money

Posted by on Nov 18, 2018 in Teaching | Comments Off on How To Build Your Guitar Teaching Business And Earn More Money

The fact that you are reading this article right now means you are currently unsatisfied with how much money you are earning as a guitar teacher (or you are ready to take things to the next level). With this in mind, you are certainly not alone. Here is the bleak reality for most guitar teachers:

1. Many guitar instructors have a hard time making ends meet in their guitar teaching business and make less than 35k annually.

2. Most people who teach guitar have no experience teaching highly skilled students.

3. The overwhelming majority of guitar teachers achieve little success and only teach for 1-2 years before quitting to work in a different profession altogether.

On the other hand, there exists a small percentage of highly successful guitar teachers who:

1. Make a minimum of 6 figures each year in their guitar teaching businesses.

2. Quickly turn their guitar students from mediocre players to highly skilled players.

3. Are able to add extra value for their students because they have extra time, energy and resources to put into their guitar instruction.

4. Generally work no more than part time hours every week.

At first, most people are shocked to hear about the above points. As someone who has trained countless people to develop successful guitar teaching businesses (by joining the elite top 1% club), I know all of these things to be true.

Additionally, the majority of guitar teachers out there do not fail because they are necessarily ‘bad’ at teaching guitar. Instead, they fail because they believe in the ‘common knowledge’ they have heard being perpetuated by other unsuccessful guitar teachers. These approaches seem rational at first glance, but in fact are highly damaging for your guitar teaching business in many ways.

Here are seven commonly accepted guitar teaching approaches that guarantee failure:

1. Giving Guitar Lessons At A Local Music Store

Many guitar teachers think that it is easier to teach at a music store (rather than on their own) and make good money because:

A. They will have to do less work to find new students since the music store will do this for them.

B. You look much more professional teaching from a music store versus teaching from home.

Both of these points are 100% false. If you teach out of a music store you are highly likely to fail and here’s why:

In reality, music stores do not have a strong reason to find new guitar students for ‘you’. Even if you work together with a music company, you will still need to come up with strategic ways to get guitar students and grow your guitar teaching business.
Additionally, you make less money when you work from a music store because you must give a large percentage of your earnings to the owner. This makes it more challenging to earn a good living as a guitar teacher.
To make things worse, music stores generally are very strict about the teaching formats they allow. In many cases, you are limited to teaching only private 1 on 1 lessons and not allowed to help your guitar students progress faster using other formats. This makes it harder to get big results for your students.
Since you can’t get great results for your students, it will be very difficult to develop the positive reputation needed to grow your guitar teaching business to the next level.

The most successful and highest earning guitar teachers never teach out of music stores. Instead, they run their own business and hire other guitar teachers to work for them. If you want to make a great living teaching guitar, you must treat it like a business and learn all you can in order to improve every aspect of it.

2. Using All Of Your Promotional Efforts To Bring In ‘New’ Students

Most people assume that searching for new students is the most important part of promoting their guitar teaching business. Of course, understanding how to attract new students is very important. However, if this is the only factor you consider while trying to build your guitar teaching business, you will quickly come across these issues:

Since you do not have a solid strategy for ‘keeping’ your students, you must invest countless hours into your promotional efforts due to the fact that the new students you gain only replace the ones you lost.
You will only make slow progress at best to build your guitar teaching business (even if you get more new students than you lose current ones). However, you can achieve much faster growth by working in several different areas simultaneously, such as: student retention, student referrals and converting potential students into actual students.

Avoid the issues I mentioned above by continually working to improve in ‘every’ area of your guitar teaching business (not just one or two). Once you do this, you will see exponential growth that will give you the ability to expand your business while working a lot less hours and putting out much less effort.

3. Always Showing Your Guitar Students Anything They Want To Learn

Many guitar teachers are in the habit of asking their students what they want to learn each time they take lessons. They believe that it is the responsibility of the student to tell the teacher what they need to work on. This is TOTALLY untrue. Consider this: if your guitar students actually knew what they needed to work on, wouldn’t they have already done it themselves and reached their guitar playing goals? The truth is that most guitar students are clueless about what they ‘should’ be working on to get better (this is why they came to you in the first place). It is not the student’s responsibility to figure this out, it is yours. You must always learn the student’s ‘long term goals’ up front and design an effective strategy to help them reach these goals. Additionally, you need to help your guitar students understand specifically WHY the things you teach them are both what they ‘need’ and ‘want’ to learn.

If you continually allow your students to tell you what they need to learn, they will NOT make any significant progress. The most they can achieve with this approach is a decent understanding of various isolated ideas… but they will not become ‘great musicians’. In fact, this approach will cause many of your guitar students to leave when they are unsatisfied with the lack of results they are getting.

In addition, not being able to effectively get results for your students will affect your reputation in a very negative way. Once you develop a bad reputation as a guitar teacher in your area, you will essentially be left with two options: Quit teaching guitar or find a new location to teach in.

4. Copying The Ideas Of Other Guitar Teachers In Your Area

Most beginning guitar teachers naturally look around to see what other teachers are doing in hopes that copying the approaches of others will help them build their businesses. The bad news is, MOST guitar teachers are unsuccessful. This means that when you copy what other teachers are doing you are only setting yourself up for the same failure.

Instead of following what other local guitar teachers do while taking a trial-and-error approach, you should surround yourself with successful guitar teachers who are already making good money in their teaching businesses. Of course, no teacher in your local area is going to want to share his/her secrets with you (since you are competing with each other) so your network must be made up of guitar teachers who do not compete with you locally.

Many guitar teachers participate in my guitar teacher improvement program and gain the benefits of working in a tight group full of successful music instructors from around the world.

5. Not Enforcing Your Lesson Policies

Most guitar teachers who are new have a fear that enforcing their lesson policies will cause them to lose their students. The truth is, this may help you retain a few students for a short period of time, but will be devastating for your guitar teaching business in the long term. Here is why:

A. This attracts guitar students who are not serious about learning. This means you will have to deal with students who are consistently late, do not pay on time and do not practice like they are supposed to.

B. Due to the above point, you will use all of your energy on ‘non-serious’ students and have little left to spare for the SERIOUS students who really do want to learn, pay on time and practice every day.

C. When you allow students to break your lesson policies, you will constantly have to deal with endless requests and complaints rather than actually helping your students become great guitar players. This means your students will not get the results they want, you will earn significantly less income, become frustrated and ultimately join the majority of unsuccessful guitar teachers I mentioned earlier.

Here is how you solve this issue: Remember, YOU are the teacher and YOU understand what is best for your guitar students. Create your lesson policy and expectations based on this understanding and make sure that your students know exactly why this policy will help them become much better players. If they do not comply, do not teach them (that’s right, refuse to work with them).

6. Lowering Your Lesson Rates In Order To Compete With Other Guitar Teachers

While giving lessons in a town or city with heavy competition from other guitar teachers, it is natural to think that lowering your lesson rates will give more potential students a chance to work with you. If you are considering this approach, chances are you think that giving cheaper lessons will make you stand out from the more ‘expensive’ guitar teachers in your area. You may have even heard students complain about not wanting to spend a lot of money on guitar lessons and allowed this to affect your judgment. However, in the end this approach will backfire on you. Here’s why:

The fact that you charge very cheap rates for lessons tells potential students that you are either new to teaching guitar or are not very good at it. In fact, most students assume that teachers with higher priced lessons charge more because they can get better results. So by charging a small amount for your lessons, you are really only driving away serious students (who are ready to spend money). The more serious a student is, the less likely they are to even think about taking lessons with you when you are the cheapest guitar teacher in town.
When you start teaching guitar while charging very cheap rates, your students will see this and think that all guitar teachers are the same (except for the price they charge for lessons). This (of course) is totally false. However, you must take this into consideration when determining your lesson rates. If you charge cheap rates from the beginning, it will only be more difficult to raise them in the future after you have conditioned your students to think that all teachers are the same.
When you gain new guitar students who were only looking for the ‘cheapest’ teacher, they will take lessons with you much less seriously. You will quickly find that these types of students do not practice or put out much effort because they do not feel like they are getting much value in return (based on how much they are spending). The more a student has to spend for lessons, the more seriously they will take it.

All of these issues will combine together to weigh you down and keep you from ever making good money teaching guitar.

So how can you solve this issue and how much SHOULD you charge for guitar lessons? Always make sure that you charge a ‘minimum’ of the average price in your local area (even if you are just getting started). Next, work to make your guitar lessons as valuable as possible in order to transform your students into great guitar players very quickly. Once you can do this, you gain the leverage to raise your rates and have a justified reason for doing so.

7. Promoting Yourself As A ‘General’ Guitar Teacher

Another misconception that most guitar teachers have is that you should try to reach as many students as possible through a highly generalized marketing approach. These teachers promote themselves by saying they teach in ‘any’ style.

The truth is, promoting yourself in this manner will mostly attract students who aren’t very serious about guitar lessons and/or don’t know what they want to play on guitar. These types of students are likely to not take practice seriously, only take lessons for a short period of time and will not be very cooperative with your lesson policies.

On the other hand, the greatest guitar students (who you want to work with) are always looking for a teacher who specializes in a specific niche because they know what they want to play and invest the time to look for someone who can help them play it.

It is crucial to understand that you will not be able to make a living as a guitar teacher if you have a schedule full of casual, non-serious students. These students will only cause you to waste time as you put up with endless lesson cancellations, missing payments and other issues. Even though these problems are only ‘partially’ related to the issue of marketing yourself to ‘all styles’, they are entirely CAUSED by it and will keep you from becoming financially successful as a guitar teacher.

With this in mind, you don’t want to become an expert for a style of music that no guitar student wants to learn. Nevertheless, you will see much more success by marketing yourself as the local ‘blues’ guitar expert (or ‘rock’, ‘metal’, ‘jazz’, etc.) instead of allowing yourself to blend in with your competitors as a teacher to ‘all styles’.

Most importantly, know that you must fill your guitar teaching schedule with the ‘right’ students if you want to make good money as a teacher. These students will quickly progress on guitar, study with you for years and help you expand your business by telling others about their positive experience.

Although I have not discussed ‘all’ of the things that cause guitar teachers to fail, after reading the points above you have gained a better understanding of why most commonly accepted guitar teaching approaches are actually ineffective and problematic.

Get guitar teaching help now and start making a lot more in your guitar teaching business while avoiding the obstacles that most teachers face (and never overcome). Once you understand what needs to be fixed, you will then be prepared to take any necessary actions to grow your guitar teaching business and earn more income from it than you ever thought possible!

Tom Hess is an electric guitar teacher online, recording artist and the guitar player of the band Rhapsody Of Fire. He trains guitar teachers from around the world on how to build their guitar teaching businesses in his guitar teaching program. Visit his musician website to get guitar teaching help, learn how to get guitar students and find more articles about teaching guitar for a living.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/T._Hess/369989

More Teaching Articles

Read More

Boost Your Guitar Teaching Skills By Avoiding These Mistakes

Posted by on Aug 26, 2018 in Teaching | Comments Off on Boost Your Guitar Teaching Skills By Avoiding These Mistakes

When thinking about getting started teaching guitar, can you relate to any of the following?

You get nervous imagining a situation when your students may ask you a question that you don’t know the answer to.
You aren’t always sure how to teach guitar effectively to all types of guitar students.
You have no idea how to measure your progress as a guitar instructor.
You simply don’t know the steps you must take to get started teaching music.

Every guitar teacher who is just starting out goes through these same thoughts and struggles. This also happens to guitar teachers who have been teaching for a while if they have never taken action to find a mentor to show them where they are going wrong in their guitar teaching methods. Most often, these guitar teachers have been teaching for years using a trial and error approach, or by seeking the advice of other guitar teachers who have only experienced small success.

Here are 11 common guitar teaching mistakes that less experienced teachers make. If you can stay away from these, you will be well on your way to becoming a highly successful guitar teacher.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number One: Not having any kind of strategy for helping your guitar students achieve their goals.

Many guitar teachers merely ‘react’ whenever a student poses a question or expresses interest in learning something new. This means that the guitar teacher does not have any plan for what is to be taught until the day of the lesson (when the student arrives). The mistake here is that the teacher is focusing too much on solving the student’s problem in the present, and in the process the student’s longer term goals and desires become ignored.

On the other hand, some guitar teachers will essentially ‘over plan’ their guitar lessons. These people will start with an idea of how they think they should teach guitar lessons, and will continue teaching that way to all of their students. This approach will fail also because it does not treat each individual guitar student as a unique person with unique needs. Not everyone learns the same way, so teaching guitar to students without being flexible with your overall guitar teaching style will not bring good results.

In order to get the best results for your guitar students you must take a balanced approach between both extremes.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Two: Not working to combine a student’s ‘wants’ with his or her ‘needs’.

The misunderstanding that most guitar instructors have is thinking that that they must either teach ‘only’ the things their students ‘want’ to learn OR force their students to practice only what they ‘need’ to know. By teaching guitar students only what they ‘want’ in the moment, you can expect very little success in your guitar teaching business. Teaching guitar students what they really ‘need’ is a much better approach. However, in order to be an effective guitar teacher, you will need to balance out both approaches. This will help your students to not only enjoy playing guitar in the moment, but also continue to make progress toward reaching their musical goals.

The greatest guitar teaching approach is to focus on the students’ goals, while also showing him/her that what they ‘need’ is the same as what they ‘want’. You must consistently keep track of their goals, and then show them what they must do to achieve those goals (while also explaining how these things work together). By doing this, you will help your guitar students gain motivation because they understand that they will be enjoying themselves throughout the learning process. This will help your students stay on track and reach their goals.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Three: Not helping your guitar students apply new guitar ideas.

One of the easiest ways to find out if a guitar teacher is doing a good job teaching is to look at his/her students. For the most part, you will see that people have guitar students that have learned a decent amount of ‘stuff’ on guitar. Unfortunately, after a closer look you will notice that these students do not actually know how to use any of this information to make great music on guitar. This is the result of a very common misunderstanding that guitar teachers make.

It is very common to see a guitar teacher who spends a lot of time showing new things to students rather than helping them to apply what they have already learned. In the end, this produces guitar students who can tell you about a bunch of guitar stuff, but in reality can’t do very much with this information.

Sometimes you will get students who ask you to show them new things on guitar. However, do not feel rushed to be continuously providing new information for them. It is best to make sure that they know how to apply what they have already learned, so that they can use it in real music.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Four: Not understanding how to work around or fix a guitar student’s playing mistakes.

If teaching guitar to students were as easy as plugging in the right answer to an equation, there would be little work for guitar teachers to do. In reality, your guitar students are ‘human’ and cannot be programmed so easily. While teaching guitar lessons, you will encounter times when your guitar students are distracted, disinterested, or are simply in the mood to play something different. In addition, some students don’t always want to play everything to perfection. The mistake that teachers make is to “let it slide” too much. In other words, they allow bad habits to build up for the sake of not being too strict. Many times this results not only in sloppy guitar playing, but could also possibly lead to injury!

On the other hand, some teachers are overly strict with their guitar students while fixing bad habits. Unfortunately, this can be a problem as well because most guitar players are not willing to take constant corrections on every little detail. As a result, such guitar teachers cause their students to feel discouraged or unmotivated since they are not getting the chance to enjoy playing and learning guitar.

To become a successful guitar teacher, you must understand the best approach for helping your students make progress on guitar, while also making sure to keep them motivated based upon their specific needs and interests. Remember, people are not computers that you can simply insert information into. They are ‘human’, and often act more based on how they are feeling emotionally in the moment, rather than from a strict assessment of the information you are teaching. Sometimes your students will become bored, distracted, or unmotivated. It is important to spot this as it is occurring so that you can know the best way to continue on with the guitar lesson.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Five: Not clearly communicating to your guitar students what you expect in terms of practice and effort on their part.

You will have some guitar students who will give you 110% when it comes to practicing at home and putting out consistent effort to become a better guitarist. However, the majority of your guitar students will not give you nearly as much effort. The reason this happens so often with most guitar teachers is because the teacher does not set any kind of standard for effort on the student’s part. Because of this, the student does not have a clear idea of how much practice and effort is required in order to be able to play guitar how they want.

The greatest guitar instructors will let their students know that they expect a certain amount of effort, and will help the student to understand why this works to benefit them. In addition, it is important not to have the same expectations for every one of your students. Remember that each student has his or her own unique needs as a guitar player.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Six: Teaching too many new ideas in each guitar lesson.

A lot of guitar teachers teach way too many new things to their students during their guitar lessons. These teachers feel that they must constantly be giving their students new material to work on for guitar. In reality, this approach is very counterproductive. It is vital that your guitar students learn how to USE what they know on guitar. Here is why many guitar teachers tend to ‘over teach’ their students:

1. The teacher is not sure of how to effectively teach their guitar students so they overcompensate by trying to continually talk about new things.

2. They have seen other guitar teachers who use this approach and think: “If it works for them, it can work for me.”

3. Some students think that constantly learning ‘new things’ on guitar is how they will become good players. Unfortunately, this is not true and leads to interactions between the teacher and student where the student says “I understand” when he doesn’t really understand at all!

To become a great guitar teacher you must understand that it is more effective to help students apply what they already know, rather than overwhelming them with new learning material. In the end, this will help your guitar students learn much faster and more efficiently.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Seven: Not understanding how to approach teaching guitar when a student ‘doesn’t get it’.

New guitar teachers usually struggle when coming up with alternative ways of explaining ideas in a manner that makes sense to any of their students. Additionally, these same guitar teachers will normally try to show their guitar students new guitar concepts by using their own learning style (instead of focusing on ‘the student’s’ learning style).

In order to best help your guitar students, it is necessary to understand if each person learns best by watching you play, by listening to you talk, or by spending more time playing guitar on their own. Once you know this, you can more effectively teach them. The best guitar teachers will create a specific strategy based around each student’s learning style in order to help the student get the most out of each lesson.

After you have taught many guitar students you will get better at identifying individual learning styles. However, if you’d like to quickly learn how to do this, you should seek out the advice of an expert guitar teacher who has already shown many other teachers how to become highly successful.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Eight: Not knowing that your guitar students don’t always need you to be a ‘teacher’.

Although you teach guitar, this does not mean that you must always think from the mindset of a ‘teacher’. The function of a teacher is to simply present and explain new information to a student. However, your guitar students will often need much more than simply someone who tells them how to play the guitar. It will not always be appropriate to teach your students new things, or to simply go over last week’s exercises. Your guitar students need someone who can do much more than this.

If you want to truly help your guitar students, you must be able to both ‘teach’ and ‘train’ them. In most cases, they will require more actual training than teaching. This means that you need to put less emphasis on showing them new things to play, and focus more on walking them through the learning process. Make sure to guide them along with encouragement to motivate them as they continue to make progress. Some of your students will feel as if they are ready to move on at times. However, don’t let them move on until YOU know they are ready. If you approach your guitar teaching like this with every student, you will save MASSIVE amounts of time and energy compared to the alternative of merely ‘teaching’ students new things.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Nine: Not paying attention to the length of time that each student comes back to take guitar lessons.

One of the biggest misunderstandings that guitar teachers have is thinking that the number of guitar students they have relates to how successful they are in their guitar teaching business. In reality, this is not a very good way to gauge your success as a guitar teacher. Which teacher do you think is having more success: A guitar teacher who has merely taught 50 students in one year (but currently only teaches 15), or a guitar teacher who has taught 50 students in a year (and has kept all 50)? After making this comparison, it should be clear that focusing to retain your guitar students is a crucial part to the success of your guitar teaching business. If you can only get your students to come back to take lessons for a couple of months at a time, you have a lot of work to do. In order to become highly successful as a guitar teacher you should have students staying with you for years at a time.

That being said, you will not keep every single guitar student for years at a time. This is because different students may have different goals that can be reached in a shorter amount of time. You must always work hard to help your students achieve their goals as quickly, and effectively as possible. However, some goals may be more vague and require more time for the student to find out what he or she really wants. In order to keep more of your students for a longer period of time, seek to understand the reasons why past students have stopped taking lessons with you. Additionally, ask your current long time guitar students why they enjoy taking lessons with you. Monitor these statistics on a consistent basis so that you can continually improve your guitar teaching methods.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Ten: Not knowing a good way to judge how well you are doing as a guitar teacher.

The majority of guitar teachers have no reliable manner for determining if they are good at teaching guitar. Here are the main reasons why this happens:

Less experienced guitar teachers often make comparisons with themselves to other local guitar teachers (who likely aren’t very successful either). They are judging their own skills as a teacher based on the merely mediocre teaching of the other guitar instructors who surround them.
Teaching guitar generally is not up to par with other music instruction. Now you understand why classical piano teachers will normally retain students for years, while many guitar instructors struggle to keep students for more than a few months.
Most guitar teachers never actually make the effort to find training to improve their guitar teaching skills. In general, they will ask other (amateur) teachers what to do, or will simply attempt to emulate the actions of others. If these things do not work, they will resort to giving guitar lessons to their students in a ‘hit or miss’ manner. Unfortunately, this tends to make guitar lessons like an ‘experiment’ for your guitar students. There are always times when you will be learning from your mistakes; however it is best to understand how to avoid them from the beginning.

Guitar Teacher Mistake Number Eleven: Not accepting responsibility for the quality of the guitar lessons you give.

When you teach guitar, your students are paying you with their money, time, and effort. It is important to work as hard as you can to reward them with the best guitar instruction possible. Fact is, most guitar teachers DO NOT put much effort at all to improve the quality of their guitar lessons, or work to help their guitar students achieve their goals faster. These types of teachers merely teach guitar to ‘get by’. Why should a guitar student ever spend their hard earned money for guitar lessons when their teacher isn’t actively working to bring them the best instruction possible? You don’t have to be an incredible guitar teacher before you ever get started teaching (of course); however, if you want to be able to provide the very best guitar teaching for your students, you will benefit immensely by getting trained, coached, and mentored to become the best guitar teacher you can be.

Remember, although there are many great guitar teachers out there, each and every one of those teachers were likely at the same point you are at right now. These great teachers did not become great by merely attempting to copy others or taking the amateur advice of other non successful guitar teachers in their area. Most likely, they made an effort to seek out a way to improve their guitar teaching skills. These guitar teachers consistently provide the highest value for their students. As a result, these people are highly successful at teaching guitar! Do you want to become the most successful guitar teacher in your area, with lots of great students who love taking lessons with you? You have the power to make this into reality… choose to become the best guitar teacher in your local area!

Tom Hess is a professional guitar teacher, composer, and the guitarist. He shows guitar teachers how to become highly successful with his guitar teacher coaching. Visit his music instruction website to receive additional free guitar teaching advice and take a free seven day mini course on becoming an incredible guitar teacher.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/T._Hess/369989

Related Teaching Articles

Read More

Teaching Bodyweight Workout at the Mall

Posted by on Jul 29, 2018 in Teaching | 36 comments

I had an opportunity to teach bodyweight workout at the middle of the Starfield Mall in Korea. These are some highlights of the day.

[Dan Jeong SNS]
★ 댄정 인스타그램
https://www.instagram.com/danjeongconditioning/

[Dan Jeong] 구독하기 Subscribe my channel
▶ http://bit.ly/2uHlAyQ

[Why I Started Lifting More Weights]
맨몸운동하는 사람이 머신을 사용하는 이유 ?!
▶ http://bit.ly/2uEpNmA

[LIVE STREAM IN KOREAN]
댄정의 첫..라이브 경험
▶ http://bit.ly/2JxJ0vG

[GROUP WORKOUT] Arm Wrestling, Planche, and Handstand Training
댄정 첫 브이로그 운동하면서 놀아요 !
▶ http://bit.ly/2NlJjfB

[WHAT’S IN MY GYM BAG?]
맨몸운동 하는 가방 대공개
▶ http://bit.ly/2NYLpmx

[I LOST MY JOB / Future Plans]
댄정 백수됨 ?! +향후계획
▶ http://bit.ly/2uwqEGW

Song:
Dyalla – Feel Good
LiamLRY – Boom Bap
DJ Quads – Downtown Funk

#bodyweight #스타필드

TEACHING STEVE HOW TO PLAY MINECRAFT! w/ UnspeakableGaming
🚩 New to the channel? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/UnspeakableGamingMinecraft

👚 MERCHANDISE –
🡆 https://www.unspeakable.co/

SUBMIT YOUR MAPS! – https://goo.gl/forms/s1nhf7DpVQgkKJET2

🎮 MY OTHER CHANNELS!
🡆 UNSPEAKABLEPLAYS 🡆 https://goo.gl/bbfyv7
🡆 REAL LIFE CHANNEL 🡆 https://goo.gl/r296vR
🡆 ASWDFZXCVBHGTYYN 🡆 https://goo.gl/SKotLJ
🡆 THE SQUAD 🡆 https://goo.gl/hVEy3L

👍 FOLLOW ME!
🡆 TWITTER – https://twitter.com/UnspeakableGame
🡆 INSTAGRAM – http://instagram.com/unspeakable
🡆 FACEBOOK – https://www.facebook.com/Nathan-Unspeakable-508389526164963/
🡆 SNAPCHAT – UnspeakableG

📶 IP 🡆 play.thesquadmc.net
🌐 Website 🡆 https://thesquadmc.net
💛 Store 🡆 https://store.thesquadmc.net
📺 Discord 🡆 https://discordapp.com/invite/v3JNWsB

Moose – https://goo.gl/8dU21t
Shark – https://goo.gl/nTEu7T

Music from Epidemic Sounds

Welcome to Epidemic Sound

Thanks for watching! Likes are greatly appreciated! Subscribe to be notified when my next video is live!

Read More

Research-Led Teaching: A Personal Perspective

Posted by on Feb 25, 2018 in Teaching | Comments Off on Research-Led Teaching: A Personal Perspective

The fact that candidates for jobs in the United Kingdom higher education sector (UKHEs) are continually asked to make presentations on topics such as ‘What are your views on, and experience of, research-led teaching in education?’, ‘How will your research contribute to the delivery of the University’s Learning and Teaching strategy?’ and ‘Describe how your research will contribute, over the next 3-5 years, to the international teaching profile of this University’, indicates the importance and perennial need to link teaching and research in the UKHEs. Additionally, those employed are encouraged to make their teaching ‘more research-led’. From this perennial desire locally, emerges coined phrases such as ‘research-led’, ‘research informed’ or ‘research enhanced’ teaching, which have now become established jargons in the sector.

One University in its learning and teaching policy defines research-led teaching as that which introduces students to the latest findings in their subjects and develops students’ powers of critical insight and intellectual synthesis. This idea is supported by writers such as Tushman & O’Reilly (2007), Anthony & Austin (2008,) Prichard (2000), and Paul & Rubin (1984) who see the role of research and its connection with teaching as enabling knowledge growth and improving practice and/or teaching.

Embedded in this definition is a reason for engaging in research-led teaching that is, to keep students informed of current developments in their chosen field and to aid the development of a cognitive skill. Another reason for engaging in research-led teaching in education and related careers, include the fact that it enables students to effectively function in many educational and related roles such as (Teaching, Educational Management or Administration in schools, Youth work, Community and Charity work, or the caring professions generally) which require:


the skill of critical analysis

critically evaluating knowledge

making rational judgment in light of good evidence

gathering and reflecting on the evidence

being creative in light of rapid change and uncertainty (Brew 2010 and Brew, & Boud 1995).

So what exactly constitutes research-led teaching?

To answer this question I pull on personal experience ‘in the field’. My experience in this area involves:


Sharing research with students. I do this in four ways:

One, I use personal research reports as teaching material during classes to enrich both postgraduate and undergraduate students’ learning. For example, my 2001 research on the church school relationship in the Cayman Islands resulted in the publication of a book with a similar title. This book is required reading for a module I teach. During specific sections of the module, the work is discussed and students are encouraged to critically think about, evaluate and challenge the claims made.

Two, during teaching, I utilise personal experiences and anecdotes/stories related to my own research to convey points of interest to students. For example, I might tell of interviewing a research participant and her responses, which betrayed her true belief about an educational issue.

Three, in addition to using personal research publications and personal stories during teaching, there is a list of required and recommended readings provided for all modules I teach. It is my responsibility to research the local archive, libraries, journals, and to order text books for all these modules. These readings are discussed during lessons and used to guide and broaden students’ thinking about the subject being studied and to actively engage them in critical examination of literary sources.

Four, I utilised the knowledge gained and data from own research on reflective teaching to construct face-to-face, online and hybrid modules for undergraduate teacher education students. Examples of my research used are:


Reflective Teaching and… (Paperback and Kindle Edition)

Reflective teaching: Properties, Tool, Benefits and Support (Paperback)

Reflection and Reflective Teaching, A Case study of Four Seasoned Teachers in the Cayman Islands (Paperback).

Reflective Teaching as Self-Directed Professional Development: building Practical or work-related knowledge.

The Role of Reflection in the Differentiated Instructional Process.

Valli’s Typology of Reflection and the analysis of pre-service teachers’ reflective journals.

A Reflective Approach to Teaching Practicum Debriefing.


Engaging students in enquiry based learning

Firstly, this involves encouraging students to engage in research by making it a required element of modules I develop and teach. By engaging in a small research project, they develop an understanding of the research process; examine the literature; pass judgement about what counts as evidence, and reflect on the evidence (Brew 2010 and Brew, & Boud 1995).

Secondly, I involve students in personal research. For example, undergraduates were involved in searching the literature which contributed to the production of the following piece: Reflective Teaching, Critical Literacy and the Teacher’s Tasks in the Critical Literacy Classroom (A Confirmatory Investigation).

Thirdly, students are required to produce a final thesis as a course requirement in a department of Education for which I was in charge. This further facilitated their induction in to research, for their involvement in the actual production of a high quality research thesis results in a greater appreciation for, and involvement in the research process.


Researching and Reflecting on own Teaching (Scholarship of Learning and Teaching.

In this approach I am involved in researching and reflecting on my own teaching and the students’ learning via action research or applied research, which involves identifying a learning/teaching problem, researching the problem, applying the solution to my teaching and publishing the results. Current examples of this occurrence are:


Encouraging Secondary Students’ Deep Reflection-on-learning: a case for a Reflective Approach to Student Learning Evaluation.

Reflective Teaching and Disruptive Behaviour in Regular High School Classrooms in London, England.

Teaching Tasks and the composition of a ‘piece’ using music technology in the classroom: Implications for the education and training of teachers.

I reflect on or critically think about my own teaching. Via this process, I reflect on what steps need to be taken to improve the learning and teaching process, using a variety of evaluation methods (i.e., reflective journals, students’ evaluation form, and personal and peer observation) and then act on them in practical ways.

Here are a few strategies for encouraging and enabling research-led teaching

The development of a culture of research is one way of encouraging and enabling research-led teaching in a HEi. This can be achieved by developing and facilitating faculty’s professional development, which enables and encourages them to engage in the ‘scholarship of teaching’. This may include instituting awards /incentives that recognize outstanding teaching, based on researching and/or studying ones’ teaching; developing policy and criteria for this recognition scheme; facilitating in-house training in the area of the scholarship of teaching, and organizing a special lecture series by noted scholars to address the idea of the scholarship of teaching.

Developing or facilitating faculty’s engagement in research and publications is another way to encourage and enable research-led teaching in a HEi. Strategies to encourage this may include: building time in the teaching schedule for faculty to engage in research; providing funding for faculty attendance and participation in local and overseas conferences; developing policies to regulate faculty attendance and participation in local and overseas conferences; providing internal forums for faculty to showcase their research, for example, a lunch hour series that is broadly advertised, where faculty can talk about and present their research ideas for discussion, and present research that they have completed; encouraging internal review of publications that faculty are planning to submit to journals or conferences, and encouraging students’ research by requiring (where appropriate) the completion of a thesis or portfolio.

Other ways to encourage and enable research-led teaching in a HEi is to encourage consultancy work by faculty by showcasing to the local university and wider community their credentials, experiences and achievements; hosting and organizing annual or biannual conferences at the University to address issues relevant to education; and using the University’s website to display faculty research and scholarship achievements.

References

Anthony, E. K & Austin M.J. (2008). The Role of an Intermediary Organization in Promoting Research in Schools of Social Work: the Case of the Bay Area Social Services Consortium. Social Work Research 32(4) 287-294

Brew, A. (2010). Imperatives and Challenges in Integrating Teaching and Research. Higher Education Research & Development 29, 139-150.

Brew, A, & Boud, D. (1995). Teaching and research; establishing the vital link with learning. Higher Education, 29, 261-273

Paul, C.W and Rubin, P.H. (1984) Teaching and Research: The Human Capital

Paradigm. Journal of Economics Education 15(2), 142-147

Prichard, R. (2000) Future Directions for Research in Caribbean Higher Education Institutions. Chapter 11 in Higher Education in the Caribbean: Past, Present & Future Directions. 251-265, ISBN 9789766400798

Tushman, M & O’Reilly III, C. (2007). Research and Relevance: Implications of pasteur’s quadrant for doctoral programs and faculty development. Academy of Management Journal 50(4), 769-774

Dr. Mark A. Minott

Contact: minott.mark@iCloud.com

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Dr._Mark_A._Minott/2236042

In this talk Roberto discusses his three phase system which he uses to teach English without teaching English, to improve the learning experience for students and the teaching practice for professors.

Robert Guzman is a full professor at the University of Puerto Rico, Aguadilla Campus. Guzman teaches undergraduate English courses in which he stresses the development of critical thinking skills and hands on language development skills. He’s also a freelance writer and political commentator on the WPRA 990 AM radio show Comunicando with host Toti Figueroa. So far Guzman has published, among other books The Devil’s Advocate Reader, Tropical Tales of Terror, Mitos y Conflictos en la Biblia and Heroes.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Video Rating: / 5

Find More Teaching Articles

Read More

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER

Posted by on Feb 11, 2018 in Teaching | 20 comments

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER

Dec. 2015 A day in the life of my full time teaching job! THANK YOU Teachers for ALL you do! In this video, I take you on a typical whirlwind day of teaching in the elementary school. We are departmentalized which means we switch classes. I teach English Language Arts which include reading, writing, grammar, and social studies. I have a morning class, then the students switch to another classroom for their math and science subjects. Let me know if you have any questions! THANKS FOR WATCHING AND SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE!
A WEEK IN THE LIFE OF A SCHOOL TEACHER: https://youtu.be/56W-Yl5EoCw
CLASSROOM TOUR 2015-2016 https://youtu.be/puajd7RiCQ0
WHAT TEACHERS DO ON TEACHER WORK DAY: https://youtu.be/C9LMWJNTbBo

CONNECT WITH ME:
http://www.instagram.com/happygj

Video Rating: / 5

Read More

Teaching A New Player How To Rust

Posted by on Jun 18, 2017 in Teaching | 20 comments

Kristian is new to the game, so I figured I’d teach him the basics of Rust…and tell him a whole bunch of bullsh*t while I giggled at him.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/StimpeeYT

Server: Viking Republic

Outro Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFwgGrLcutw

Production Music courtesy of Epidemic Sound: http://www.epidemicsound.com

If you enjoyed the video, leave a like 😮
If you really enjoyed the video, leave a comment :O

Thanks for watching, and see you in the next one!

Read More